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What: Conference on ‘Evidence-based Policy Making for Intellectual Property’

When: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 from 2 to 5 p.m. ET

Where: At the Hoover Institution in Washington D.C. (see below for address) or via webinar. For webinar access, see the instructions at the end of the article.

  • Does the US patent system as currently constituted hold up or push forward the commercialization of technological innovations?

  • Does the US patent system frustrate or facilitate the inventive activities and entrepreneurial processes central to economic growth?

     These and other burning questions will be discussed soon at a joint USPTO/Hoover Institution conference on June 16, 2015 entitled “What is the Academy’s Role in Evidence-based Policy Making for Intellectual Property.” The conference takes place on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 from 2 to 5 p.m. ET.   To convert the time to the time in your location, you can check a time converter, like the one at this link.

Is the U.S. patent system as American as apple pie? The USPTO and the Hoover Institution will discuss this and other burning questions at a June 16 conference.

Is the U.S. patent system as American as apple pie? The USPTO and the Hoover Institution will discuss this and other burning questions at a June 16 conference.

Three current USPTO Edison Research Scholars have been busy addressing an executive action requesting data and research on patent litigation issues and will be speaking at the conference. The Scholars will share their research topics, methodologies, and findings along with suggestions for strengthening the litigation system.

Here’s an excerpt from info on the conference to give you an idea of the interesting  and important topics that will be discussed:

The US patent system is a solution to a delicate balancing act where the complete absence of intellectual property rights or the overly broad specification of those rights can thwart innovation. Inventors require the means to earn a return on the years spent perfecting an invention. Conversely, patents extending in perpetuity that require licensing and royalty payments would dissuade legitimate use and encourage excessive imitation. Further, a patent system providing property rights to the original patent holder for all future inventions that built on the original idea is nonoptimal.

The program is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Hoover Institution, located at 1399 New York Avenue, NW, 5th floor, or by webinar.  If you’re lucky enough to attend in-person, there will be a reception following the talk, where you can continue the discussion with the featured speakers.  Note that seating is limited, and that, if you are attending in person, you should RSVP to: https://fs30.formsite.com/HooverinWashington/form14/index.html.

For webinar access information, please visit the link, here.  Note that the link at times seems broken, so if you are having trouble with the link, try the URL here:

http://www.hoover.org/events/what-academys-role-evidence-based-policy-making-intellectual-property

So far it seems that you won’t need an RSVP to watch the conference via webinar (but check the Hoover Inst.’s website as June 16 nears just to be sure). Also, the U-Stream for viewing the conference online looks like it will be at the link, so you probably won’t need an access code.

Featured speakers include:

  • Richard Sousa, Hoover Institution
  • Shira Perlmutter, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Chief Policy Officer and Director for International Affairs
  • Professor Jay Kesan, University of Illinois School of Law
  • F. Scott Kieff, U.S. International Trade Commission and George Washington University School of Law
  • Steve Haber, Hoover Institution and Stanford University
  • Alan Marco, U.S Patent and Trademark Office, Chief Economist
  • Tim Simcoe, President’s Council of Economic Advisers and Boston University
  • Josh Wright, Federal Trade Commission and George Mason University
  • Edison Research Scholars:
    • Professor Joe Bailey, University of Maryland
    • Professor Josh Sarnoff, DePaul University
    • Professor Deepak Hegde, New York University

Let us know if you watched/attended and if you learned anything!

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